Frequently Asked Questions

Who is WordLift for?

WordLift is for all bloggers, journalists, and content marketers publishing and fighting for readers’ attention on the web. WordLift democratizes the field, bringing to the hands of all web content creators the technology that web publisher giants such as Google, Facebook and the BBC are using to organize and monetize their content. WordLift helps you create richer and more engaging content, optimizes it for all search engines and efficiently organizes your content creation process, allowing you to reach and speak directly to your tribe.

Why shall I use WordLift?

Organizing web content around an internal vocabulary rather than traditional web pages helps both users and machines finding and accessing it, improving navigation, content re-use, content repurposing, and search engine rankings. WordLift organizes content, reducing the complexity of content management and content marketing operations, letting bloggers and site owners focus on stories and communities. WordLift enriches your content with contextual information, links, and media, from custom vocabularies and/or the wealth of open data available on the web, bringing your user experience to a new level of engagement. WordLift connects content with cross-media discovery and recommendations widgets, increasing content quality, exposure, trustworthiness and readership engagement. WordLift optimizes content, complementing the offer of plug-ins such as SEO Ultimate or Yoast, automatically adding schema.org markups to your text, allowing all search engines to properly index your pages and deliver more traffic to your site.

How does it work?

Note

To know more about how WordLift works, please watch the step by step video tutorials on our website.

WordLift works in subsequent stages.

  1. The first step provides a full text analysis and suggests concepts and relationships found in open vocabularies (such as DBpedia, Wikidata, GeoNames, etc) to help writers classify and enrich their content and structure it for search engines like Google, according to schema.org vocabulary.
  2. Writers can then create new entities, to complement the ones suggested automatically, and to be published as part of a proprietary vocabulary, acting both as a reference and a search magnet for their readers, according to the editorial plans.
  3. WordLift also assists writers suggesting links, media and providing a set of powerful visualization widgets to connect and recommend alternative content, to boost readers’ engagement.
  4. Finally WordLift provides means to record all these relationships in a graph database allowing search queries like “find all contents related to concept_y and relevant for target_z”.

What are the languages supported by WordLift?

WordLift currently supports the following languages: English, 中文 (Chinese), Español (Spanish), Русский (Russian), Português (Portuguese), Français (French), Deutsch (German), Italiano (Italian), Nederlands (Dutch), Svenska (Swedish) and Dansk (Danish).

Note

WordLift supports one language at the time. The main language of the website can be configured from the WordLift settings. Review the configuration settings for more information.

Is there a free trial?

No. We do not offer a free trial but your monthly subscription comes with a 14-day 100% money back guarantee. If after two weeks you are not happy with WordLift, contact us and we will refund you right away, no questions asked. We do offer free additional months though, with the purchase of our 6-month or 12-month packages. Check it out

Who owns the structured metadata created with WordLift?

You do! We believe content creators should retain the commercial value of their content and all the data they create and exploit it through new business models based on content syndication, data-as-a-service and a stronger relationship with their audience. You can open your datasets to the public, attaching to it a free or a commercial licence. Otherwise, use your data to feed chat bots such as Facebook Messenger or Telegram, providing live feed updates on your activity and/or automatic customer service in real time.

What happens if I stop using WordLift?

  1. If you stop paying for your subscription, but keep the plugin on your site, all the entities, metadata and pages you created with wordlift will still be available on your site - you won’t be able to update it any longer, but they will still work just fine as they were at the moment you removed the key. The data you’ve created belongs to you and you can always request to us a data dump that is available in various machine-readable formats.
  2. if you deactivate the plugin instead, the vocabulary (metadata, entity and pages) will disappear from your dashboard, but everything you created is stored in your website Database in WordPress, and you will be able to download it, transfer it or re-activate it again anytime from the plugin menu.
  3. Turning off WordLift on our side, it would be like turning off all the keys and un-publish all the linked data you’ve created, not the plug-in itself, so it will be like #1 - you could get the data back from us and re-publish it as linked data on your own infrastructure.
  4. WordLift’s technology is entirely open source: it takes development skills, infrastructure and some wisdom to nicely bring all the pieces together without our support.
  5. Your vocabulary (article metadata and entities) are published as linked data and you can always request a data dump in any of the following formats: RDF/XML, Turtle, N3, JSON-LD.

Why and how should I customize the url of the entity pages created in my vocabulary?

When selecting or creating new entities with WordLift, you are actively building your internal vocabulary, adding pages to your website. When you first built your website, you chose a pattern for the url of the pages you were going to add, such as www.domain.com/name-of-the-page or www.domain.com/seo-keyword/name-of-the-page. The same applies with all the pages created with WordLift inside your vocabulary.

  1. By default WordLift will add the word “vocabulary” between your root domain and the name of the page: www.domain.com/vocabulary/name-of-the-entity-page.
  2. You can delete the word vocabulary if you want the new entity page to be inside your root domain folder: www.domain.com/name-of-the-entity-page.
  3. Or you can replace vocabulary with another keyword (or keywords) of your choice, for SEO or branding reason: www.domain.com/seo-keyword/name-of-the-entity-page.

Why is it important to organize my content and publish it as Linked Data?

Organizing web content around concepts rather than traditional web pages helps both users and machines finding and accessing it, improves navigation, content re-use, content repurposing and search engine rankings. Enriching content with contextual information, links and media, from custom vocabularies and/or the wealth of open data available on the web, brings the user experience to a new level of engagement. Structuring content with richer metadata and publishing it as linked data makes it discoverable and searchable, providing new ways of reaching targets.

Why is WordLift innovative

WordLift is first-to-market following a “content organization” approach which allows the classification and direct exploitation of proprietary content and structured metadata. Wordlift helps publishers create their knowledge graph, exploit it and monetize it. Finally WordLift complements the offer of plug-ins such as SEO Ultimate or Yoast automatically adding schema.org mark-ups to content, allowing search engines to properly index pages, increasing traffic from organic searches.

What is content enrichment?

Content enrichment is a processes used to refine and improve textual content by embedding structured data (metadata) on web pages. This metadata is made available to search engines and other data consumers.

What entity types are supported and how they map to Schema.org?

Thing, Person, Place, Event, Organization, LocalBusiness and Creative Work are the supported types. Review the Edit Entity page for more information.

When should I create a new entity?

You should create a new entity when this is directly relevant to the content you’re writing and it doesn’t already exist. When an entity is properly recognised by WordLift you shall edit this entity rather then creating a new one.

You can add as many entities as you like.

What are the guidelines for creating new entities to annotate a blog post or a page?

A basic guideline for adding a new entity is:

people should create entities that a librarian would plausibly use to classify the content as if it was a book.

The purpose of using WordLift is to (1) categorize your content, (2) help people find content of interest to them, and (3) help WordLift describe your contents in machine-readable format so that other computers can re-use it.

In some cases key concepts that are important for (1), (2) and (3) are not automatically detected by WordLift and need to be taught. To teach WordLift new concepts a new entity shall be created.

Note

When entities already exist we shall always avoid creating a new entity.

People should add entities that are accurate and directly relevant to the content they’re writing.

Excessively broad entities should not be added to content.

Content should not be overloaded with entities to increase its distribution online. As a general guideline, 6–8 entities should be adequate for most blog posts (based on the lenght of the article). If an article has too many entities it may be that some of the entities could be replaced with a single broader entity.

All entities shall be matched to the proper language of the content.

What factors determine Wordlift’s rating of an entity?

The entity rating in WordLift takes under account the following factors:

  • Every entity should be linked to one or more related posts.
  • Every entity should have its own description.
  • Every entity should link to other entities - when we select other entities to enrich the description of an entity we create relationships in the site’s knowledge graph.
  • Entities, just like any post in WordPress, can be kept as draft. Only when we publish them they become available in the analysis and we can use them to classify our contents.
  • Entities shall have a feautured image. When we add a featured image to an entity we’re adding the schema-org:image attribute to it.
  • Every entity (unless we’re creating something completely new) should be interlinked with the same entity containedin at least one other dataset. This is called data interlinking and can be done by adding a link to the equivalent entity using the sameAs attribute.
  • Every entity has a type (i.e. Person, Place, Organization, …) and every type has its own set of properties. When we complete all the properties of an entity we increase the entity visibility and usefulness.

What are the datasets WordLift uses for named entity recognition?

WordLift by default uses DBpedia and Freebase to detect and link named entities. With a custom configuration, the content analysis services provided by Redlink and available via our professional services, can use any RDF-based graph. It is also possible to use multiple graphs for named entity recognition and dereferencing.

What is a triple?

A triple is a set of three elements: a subject, a predicate, and an object. Triples are linked together to form a graph that is without hierarchy, is machine readable, and can be used to infer new facts. Triples in WordLift describe facts as metadata about an article or an entity.

Are there any integrations with Neo4j?

Neo4j is a graph database. WordLift stores data in a Linked Data store (Apache Marmotta) which provides linked data and SPARQL end-points. As long as Neo4j provides connectors for those interfaces, then an integration is possible.